Monday, July 1, 2013

6 Websites To Post Your Writing

Smashwords

Usually my second stop after Amazon, where you can't post writing for free (the minimum is $0.99). Smashwords allows for free and "pay what you want" options, and also distributes to sites like Sony, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, and the Apple store. You can use the Smashwords Channel Manager to choose where you want your writing to show up. I usually opt out of Amazon and Kobo, and upload to those sites separately. Smashwords minces the file you upload (an HTML, for example) and makes it available as Epub, Mobi and a variety of other formats.


Feedbooks

I like this site. It looks great, it's intuitive and it spits out your story as an Epub, Mobi and PDF. It keeps statistics and makes neat graphs of the downloads of your stories, and I always end up racking up the views. There's also a "Send to iPad" button, but I've never used it and I can only assume that it does what it sounds like it does.


Readwave

Easy to use and has a pretty layout. All reading is done on the site, and it tracks the number of reads and makes it easy for people to share the stories they like. When you first upload something, your story shows up on the front page. Having a good cover image and possibly friends on the site help boost your story's popularity.


Booksie

I found this at the same time as I found Readwave, and the sites seem similar to me. Booksie looks slightly worse but is slightly more functional. Although it can generate ebooks from your stories, the formatting and characters end up so screwy for me that I consider Booksie ab online-only reading site. Like Readwave, you see the number of reads. Like Readwave, there's a gentle social network aspect to the whole thing.


Wattpad

I haven't used this one yet.

Textnovel

This is a strange one. Although you can post anything you like, from a story to a novel, the site is mostly about cell phone novels. As far as I know, it's the only English language site that does offer cell phone novel downloads. What is a cell phone novel? It's a type of writing done in bursts of Twitter-length chapters that is crazy popular in Japan.